Multiple works by David Tschitschkan/protestors   On Tuesday, February 8, 2017, masked perpetrators attacked the Visual Culture Research Center (VCRC) in Kiev, destroying  an exhibition  by the Ukrainian artist David Tschitschkan.   The targeted exhibition featured artworks with political content in which the artist expressed a critical view on nationalism, and a sense of a missed opportunity in the Maidan Movement and Ukrainian Revolution of 2014.  Surveillance footage from the site shows two women and 12 masked men appearing at the VCRC shortly before 6 p.m. The group attacked a security guard and immediately began to destroy artworks in the show. The attack lasted two minutes, after which the squad left the premises. In addition to tearing and spraying over collages, the vandals scrawled slogans such as “Moscow’s Mouthpiece,” “Servants of Separatists,” or “Glory to Ukraine.” VCRC Director Wassyl Tscherepanyn told APA on Wednesday that the police arrived 40 minutes after the incident and initially refused to search for the perpetrators.  The show, which opened on February 2, had received threats from right-wing extremists prior to the attack. A guided tour with the artist slated for February 4 had been called off, but right-wing radicals reportedly attacked a visitor that day and tore down posters advertising the show.  According to VCRC director Tscherepanyn, the exhibition, which will remain on view in its current vandalized form, also critically confronts a current ideological policy in Ukraine, which, with a state-ordered removal of symbols and designations from Soviet times, propagates the “decommunization” of public space.

Multiple works by David Tschitschkan/protestors 

On Tuesday, February 8, 2017, masked perpetrators attacked the Visual Culture Research Center (VCRC) in Kiev, destroying an exhibition by the Ukrainian artist David Tschitschkan. 

The targeted exhibition featured artworks with political content in which the artist expressed a critical view on nationalism, and a sense of a missed opportunity in the Maidan Movement and Ukrainian Revolution of 2014.

Surveillance footage from the site shows two women and 12 masked men appearing at the VCRC shortly before 6 p.m. The group attacked a security guard and immediately began to destroy artworks in the show. The attack lasted two minutes, after which the squad left the premises. In addition to tearing and spraying over collages, the vandals scrawled slogans such as “Moscow’s Mouthpiece,” “Servants of Separatists,” or “Glory to Ukraine.” VCRC Director Wassyl Tscherepanyn told APA on Wednesday that the police arrived 40 minutes after the incident and initially refused to search for the perpetrators.

The show, which opened on February 2, had received threats from right-wing extremists prior to the attack. A guided tour with the artist slated for February 4 had been called off, but right-wing radicals reportedly attacked a visitor that day and tore down posters advertising the show.

According to VCRC director Tscherepanyn, the exhibition, which will remain on view in its current vandalized form, also critically confronts a current ideological policy in Ukraine, which, with a state-ordered removal of symbols and designations from Soviet times, propagates the “decommunization” of public space.

Christopher Schreck