Francois Boucher (unidentified artwork) / ink 
 In 1912, a woman vandalized a portrait by 18th-century painter Francois Boucher, coloring in the eyes, nose, and mouth of  with red ink and a paint brush.  
 After initially giving the false name Delaure Frolaine, the culprit was eventually identified as Prolaine Delarre, a Parisian seamstress. Explaining her actions, she said, “I am miserably hungry and have been unable to find work. I often go to the Louvre, and the sight of the young woman in the picture with a happy smile and luxurious clothes maddened me. I decided to mutilate her hateful face in the hope that perhaps after that people would notice me and save me from starving.” With that she added, “The picture displeased me and I wished to correct what I considered wrong.”

Francois Boucher (unidentified artwork) / ink

In 1912, a woman vandalized a portrait by 18th-century painter Francois Boucher, coloring in the eyes, nose, and mouth of  with red ink and a paint brush. 

After initially giving the false name Delaure Frolaine, the culprit was eventually identified as Prolaine Delarre, a Parisian seamstress. Explaining her actions, she said, “I am miserably hungry and have been unable to find work. I often go to the Louvre, and the sight of the young woman in the picture with a happy smile and luxurious clothes maddened me. I decided to mutilate her hateful face in the hope that perhaps after that people would notice me and save me from starving.” With that she added, “The picture displeased me and I wished to correct what I considered wrong.”

Christopher Schreck