Andy Warhol “Marilyn” (various canvases) / gunfire  In the fall of 1964, a set of Warhol’s silkscreen series were damaged by artist Dorothy Podber during a visit to Warhol’s E 47th St studio. Dressed in black leather, white gloves and accompanied by a Great Dane called Carmen Miranda, Podber asked Warhol if she could shoot some of his paintings. Assuming she meant with a camera, Warhol agreed. Podber then produced a pistol and fired at a stack of paintings, penetrating four canvases through the portrait’s brow. One of the works, repaired and re-titled “Shot Red Marilyn,“ was eventually sold for $4 million in 1989, at the time setting a record at auction for a Warhol work. 

Andy Warhol “Marilyn” (various canvases) / gunfire

In the fall of 1964, a set of Warhol’s silkscreen series were damaged by artist Dorothy Podber during a visit to Warhol’s E 47th St studio. Dressed in black leather, white gloves and accompanied by a Great Dane called Carmen Miranda, Podber asked Warhol if she could shoot some of his paintings. Assuming she meant with a camera, Warhol agreed. Podber then produced a pistol and fired at a stack of paintings, penetrating four canvases through the portrait’s brow. One of the works, repaired and re-titled “Shot Red Marilyn,“ was eventually sold for $4 million in 1989, at the time setting a record at auction for a Warhol work. 

Christopher Schreck